IntroductionKnockout.js

Let’s wrap up our little Knockout powered single-page application. We already covered 3 out of 4 parts of the timesheets application.

Time to finish up with the fourth and final part, deleting timesheets. Using some Twitter Bootstrap and Knockout magic it shouldn’t take that long.

Read the rest of this entry »

IntroductionKnockout.js

In part 3 of this series we’ll implement another feature of our little Knockout.js powered CRUD application. We already talked about read and create in the first two articles, skim through them if you want to get up to speed.

The next logical step after enabling users to add timesheets is to allow them to edit the new records. Time to implement some update functionality.

Read the rest of this entry »

IntroductionKnockout.js

Let’s start where we left off. Go ahead and download the source code of the previous part, unzip it and open it up in Visual Studio.

Last time we retrieved a list of timesheets, pushed it into an observable array and used declarative bindings (data-bind) to associate DOM elements with our view model. In other words we databound it to a table. Knockout then automagically rendered a row for each timesheet in the array.

Let’s proceed with the next step in our little CRUD application and add support for creating new timesheets.

Read the rest of this entry »

IntroductionKnockout.js

The last two posts were introductory posts to Twitter Bootstrap and MongoDB. Let’s combine these two technologies with ASP.NET MVC 4, Web API and Knockout.js to create a simple Single-page Application.

The goal is to fit all the necessary code – HTML, JavaScript and CSS on one single page, hence the name. This results in a more fluid user experience. We will not be doing any full page reloads or transfer control to another page. All interaction with the server will consist solely out lightweight JSON communication.

Read the rest of this entry »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 341 other followers